How the children expressed the Holocaust.

These first lines of the blog were actually entered last.I knew I would be emotional when doing this blog. Below are the ways how the children expressed the holocaust. It really is heartbreaking but it is important we know how they felt.Throughout their suffering some kids still had hope , even for those they had seen die.

Yehuda Bacon’s drawing of his Father dying in the gas chamber.

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The Butterfly

The last, the very last,
So richly, brightly, dazzlingly yellow.
Perhaps if the sun’s tears would sing
against a white stone….

Such, such a yellow
Is carried lightly ’way up high.
It went away I’m sure
because it wished
to kiss the world good-bye.

For seven weeks I’ve lived in here,
Penned up inside this ghetto.
But I have found what I love here.
The dandelions call to me
And the white chestnut branches in the court.
Only I never saw another butterfly.

That butterfly was the last one.
Butterflies don’t live in here, in the ghetto.

Pavel Friedman, April 6, 1942
I am a Jew
I am a Jew
 

I am a Jew and will be a Jew forever.
Even if I should die from hunger,
never will I submit.
I will always fight for my people,
on my honor.
I will never be ashamed of them;
I give my word.

I am proud of my people,
how dignified they are.
Even though I am oppressed,
I will always come back to life.

Franta Bass

 

This girl was asked to draw how she saw her time in Auschwitz on a blackboard. The look in her eyes even says enough.

A girl who grew up in a concentration camp draws a picture of home while living in a residence for disturbed children, 1948

“Everyone was hungry” Liana Franklová 10 years old. Terezín

everyone-was-hungry

 Ella Liebermann. 16 years old. Children were torn out from the arms of their mothers. Bedzin’s Ghetto. Poland.
ella_2

At Terezín

When a new child comes
Everything seems strange to him.
What, on the ground I have to lie?
Eat black potatoes? No! Not I!
I’ve got to stay? It’s dirty here!
The floor- why, look, it’s dirt, I fear!
And I’m supposed to sleep on it?
I’ll get all dirty!

Here the sound of shouting, cries,
And oh, so many flies.
Everyone knows flies carry disease.
Oooh, something bit me! Wasn’t that a bedbug?
Here in Terezín, life is hell
and when I’ll go home again, I can’t yet tell.

“Teddy” 1943

Edita Pollakova. 9 years old. The deportation train arrives at Terezin. Edita died the October 4th of 1944 at Auschwitz.

edita_pollakova

Unknown, but the pictures says enough.

children

On a Sunny Evening

On a purple, sun-shot evening
Under wide-flowering chestnut trees
Upon the threshold full of dust
Yesterday, today, the days are all like these.

Trees flower forth in beauty,
Lovely too their very wood all gnarled and old
That I am half afraid to peer
Into their crowns of green and gold.

The sun has made a veil of gold
So lovely that my body aches.
Above, the heavens shriek with blue
Convinced I’ve smiled by some mistake.
The world’s abloom and seems to smile.
I want to fly but where, how high?
If in barbed wire, things can bloom
Why couldn’t I? I will not die!

Michael Flack, 1944

Helga Weissova. The last drawing of her series, made at Terezín’s exit in 1945. Everything can be sensed in the children’s look.

helga_6

Ella Liebermann. 16 years old. Very tight, the jews from every part of Europe were sent to the death.Bedzin’s ghetto. Poland.

ella_1

Malvina Lowova, who was killed aged 12, drew a family being deported under armed guard while farmers armed with pitchforks threaten them.

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