The US Presidential inauguration

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“I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Today we’ll see probably the most controversial but also most interesting inauguration we have seen in decades if not ever. It is therefor a good opportunity to look back at some historical inaugurations.

The US president can only serve 2 terms, the only exception is when the Vice President becomes President during the a term, he/she can still be elected twice after that term.

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William Henry Harrison Sr. (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was the ninth President of the United States (1841), an American military officer and politician, and the last president born as a British subject.

He took the oath of office on March 4, 1841, a cold and wet day. He wore neither an overcoat nor hat, rode on horseback to the ceremony rather than in the closed carriage that had been offered him, and delivered the longest inaugural address in American history. At 8,445 words, it took him nearly two hours to read, although his friend and fellow Whig Daniel Webster had edited it for length.

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He was 68 years, 23 days old at the time of his inauguration, the oldest President-elect to take office until Ronald Reagan in 1981.

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Harrison died 31 days into his term of complications from pneumonia, serving the shortest tenure in United States presidential history. He was the first president to die in office, and his death sparked a brief constitutional crisis, but its resolution left unsettled many questions following the presidential line of succession in regard to the Constitution until the passage of the 25th Amendment in 1967.

https://dirkdeklein.net/2016/11/13/1841-the-year-of-three-us-presidents/

He was the grandfather of Benjamin Harrison, who served as the 23rd President from 1889 to 1893.

Portrait of President Benjamin Harrison

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

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Running as a Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections (no other President had served more than two terms), was the longest-running president in U.S. history, and dominated his party after 1932 as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century.

The third inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt as President of the United States was held on Monday, January 20, 1941 on the East Portico of the United States Capitol in Washington D.C.. The inauguration marked the commencement of the third four-year term of Franklin D. Roosevelt as President and the only four-year term of Henry A. Wallace as Vice President. This was the first and only time a president has been inaugurated for a third term. (The Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1951, limits the number of time a person can be elected President to two.)

Chief Justice Charles E. Hughes administered the presidential oath of office to Roosevelt, who placed his hand upon the same family Bible used for his 1933 and 1937 Inaugurations, open to I Corinthians 13, as he recited the oath.

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Out-going Vice President, John Nance Garner, administered the vice presidential oath to Wallace.

The fourth inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt as President of the United States was held on January 20, 1945. The inauguration marked the commencement of the fourth term of Franklin D. Roosevelt as President and the only term of Harry S. Truman as Vice President. This was the first and only time a president has been inaugurated for a fourth term. (The Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1951, limits the number of time a person can be elected President to two.) Roosevelt died 82 days into this term, and Truman succeeded to the presidency.

Due to austerity measures in effect during World War II, the inauguration was held on the South Portico of the White House, rather than the Capitol. The parade and other festivities were canceled as well. The oath was administered by Chief Justice Harlan F. Stone and the subsequent address was one of the shortest on record. This was also the last time that the outgoing Vice President swore in his successor, which had previously been the practice.

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Roosevelt died a few months after the inauguration on the 12th of April.

Amendment XXII

(The proposed amendment was sent to the states Mar. 21, 1947, by the Eightieth Congress. It was ratified Feb. 27, 1951.)

Section 1

[Limit to number of terms a president may serve.]

No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once. But this article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

Section 2

[Ratification.]

This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.

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