Reporting the Holocaust.

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It is often said that no one knew what happened in the concentration camps. But in fact people just didn’t want to know or could fathom the horrors and therefore decided to stick their heads in the sand.

I am not referring to the Germans on this occasion but to the people in the USA,UK and other European countries, if they only would have paid more attention to the various reports which were published. like the above newspaper article of June 25, 1942.

Or the headlines below which were in the news prior to the holocaust.

The Times, 8 November 1935

“Like so many Nazi catchwords… “May Jewry perish!” – was meant literally and will be literally brought to pass if the fanatics have their way.”

 

New York Times, 16 August 1936

“This contact with many nationalities and races has made the Germans more human again.” Frederick T Birchall reports on the Berlin Olympics,

 

The Times, 25 October 1940

“…they will be driven into the ghetto forcibly. An official explanation says that Jewish homes are known to be breeding-places of pestilence.” Report on  the sealing of the Warsaw Ghetto

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Sources

BBC

The Guatdian

 

The first broadsheet newspaper

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On this day 400 years ago the first Dutch newspaper was published. Courante uyt Italien, Duytslandt, &c. was the first Dutch newspaper and published weekly. The paper does not reveal the name of the printer or the publisher, but based on similar papers published later, it is thought that Joris Veseler was the printer and Caspar van Hilten its editor and publisher.

It was a regular weekly publication. It can be called the first broadsheet paper, because it was issued in folio-size. Before this, news periodicals had been pamphlets in quarto-size.

The Courante appeared until about 1672 and was then merged with the Ordinarisse Middel-Weeckse Courant and the Ordinaris Dingsdaegse Courant into the Amsterdam Courant, which eventually merged with De Telegraaf in 1903.

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Stanley Morison and some other authors regard the Courante as the world’s first proper newspaper. In their view, the earlier news periodicals, such as the German Relation: aller Fürnemmen und gedenckwürdigen Historien and the Avisa Relation oder Zeitung, were not newspapers but pamphlets or newsbooks. They argue that the Courante was the first to express the typographic conventions that have been associated with newspapers ever since.
Two years after starting the Courante, Veseler printed the first newspaper in English for the publisher Pieter van den Keere. It followed the format of the Courante.
After the very beginning, English news periodicals reverted to the pamphlet form. However, in 1665 the Oxford Gazette was published following the style of the Dutch Courante and that ended the era of the newsbooks in England.

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The Führer is dead. Auf nie wiedersehen.

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For all of you who don’t know German, the second part of the title translates to “that we will never see you again” It has always been a puzzle to me why the death of Adolf Hitler was not turned into a global holiday. Maybe it is because of fears it also may be used by followers of the Austrian turned German leader.

I know History Channel is airing a show celled “Hunting Hitler” aiming to proof that he didn’t die but escaped to Argentina, their investigation is omitting some key elements though, like eye witness reports of those in the bunker. They also work on the assumption that he was last seen in public on his birthday April 20 1945, this is also not true. This is the last picture taken of Hitler on April 28 1945.

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Another key factor they fail to mention in the show is the fact that a day before he killed himself he got married to Eva Braun. Aside from all of that, he often said if he felt the war was lost he’d kill himself. So let’s forget about all these conspiracy therories for a while.

The world reacted in different ways on the news of his death.

The Irish Taosieach(prime minister), Éamon de Valera,  and president Douglas Hyde, bot offered condolences to Germany when the news of Hitler’s death broke.Ireland was neutral during WWII and de Valera stated he was only following diplomatic protocol.

The German embassy in Sweden flew the flag at half mast the day Hitler died, April 30, 1945.

The German embassy in Sweden flying the flag at half mast the day Hitler died, April 30th 1945

In the Netherlands mock mourning cards were published, the one below is using the Veni,Vidi,Vici (came.saw,conquered) analogy. Translation Hitler came but not to England,Hitler Saw Moscow, Hitler lost the war.rouwkaart hitler

Below are some news headlines covering the death of Hitler.

The announcement of Hitler’s and Goebbels’s death in the Bredasche Courant, Dutch Newspaper.

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Headline from “The Stars and Stripes” for May 2, 1945.

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Headline of La France Soir

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The Germans had a different spin on the news the headlines in the Oberdonau-Zeitung seems to indicate rather then having committed suicide he was ‘fallen’, he ‘sacrificed’ his life in the battle against Bolshevism.

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The Daily Mail also reported the appointment of Doenitz as the new German leader.daily_mail_may_2nd_1945

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WWII Newspaper coverage

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Good news coverage is always very important to keep yourself informed, but in times of war this importance is amplified manyfold.

I still clearly remember when the  Gulf war-Operation Desert storm  broke out, it was probably one of the first times there was instant live news coverage of a war, and it was mesmerizing, The media used then was television, of course during WWII the television wasn’t as advanced as it is now so people relied on Newspapers to stay informed.

Some of the news coverage was heavily propagandized though. Below are some examples of Newspaper headlined from WWII, in no particular order.

1943 Volkischer Beobachter (Germany) front page reporting the German Army defeat at Stalingrad saying “They died, so that Germany can live”

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so it begins

 

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This is a strange one, it is a German propaganda news paper in English , called Swastika Times.

The Axis powers, especially Germany, also produced leaflets and newspapers targeted on enemy soldiers. Consider again the situation in North West Europe after D-Day. The Germans executed an extensive and inventive leaflet campaign against the Allied forces as they fought their way across France and Belgium into Germany. Other than during the Ardennes Offensive they had relatively little news to exploit in their favour but certain themes had the potential to weaken the enemy soldier’s morale, make him over-self-protective, and question his post-war prospects. Relative to the Allies’ well-oiled newspaper publishing machine, the German’s newspaper publishing efforts appeared to be sporadic and inconsistent.

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I am passionate about my site and I know you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

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WWII Newspaper ads,articles and pictures

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This is just a picture blog of random ads ads and pictures which appeared in newspapers during WWII.

In this image provided by the Army Press Relations, although Colonel Floyd E. Dunn, Sioux City, Iowa knows his jungle warfare, when it comes to the tenor saxophone, he gives in to the expert coaching of band leader Corporal Leon D. Weills of West Sommerville, Massachusetts. It all came about when musical-minded GI’s of the Americal division decided to entertain men on the fighting outposts in the South Pacific with probing jive on Oct. 14, 1944. With instruments provided by the Special Service Office, the combat soldiers journeyed through 5000 yards of jungle to put on the show. From left to right the men are: Front row – Pvt. Robert A. Silverdrist, Chicago, Ill.; Cpl. Leon D. Wells, West Sommerville, Mass.; Col. Floyd E. Dunn, Sioux City, Iowa; Pvt. Erric V. Carlson, Tanana, Alaska; Pfc. Harold D. Fisher, Youngstown, Ohio; Pvt. George Zito, Los Angeles, Calif.; Pvt. Perry T. Austin, Kenniwick, Wash.; row two – Pfc. Ben A. Cuatto, Salt Lake City, Utah; Pvt. Ralph C. Kagle, Fornfelt, Mo.; Pfc. Jack A. Davis, Lampeer, Mich.; William D. Holland, South Buro, Mass.; Cpl. Arthur J. Rauhala, Painsville, Ohio; and Pvt. William D. Cribley, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Drummer – Pvt. James E. Pabilla, Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Army Press Relations)

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Seen here is an army troop at Camp Douglas near Salt Lake City in December 1942. (AP Photo)

Military Recreation

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British Royal Navy Recruiting Poster Print 1940

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Imagined German Intelligence Officer thanks British Forces for giving away details of operations.

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The Crossfield family during WWII

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The Gloucester Citizen announces the start of WW2

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WWII Coke Ad illustration Soldier

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The Pilot (Southern Pines, N.C.), October 27, 1944

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