The story of Joseph Schleifstein, the youngest survivor of Buchenwald concentration camp.

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Source

https://www.facebook.com/groups/HSA.Archive/

Advertisements

You will never.

Milch

You will never know how it feels like to fall in love, and wake up every morning next to the love of your life.

You will never know the anxiety of school exams.

You will never know that nervousness of a first working day.

You will never know how it feels like to have your teenage heart broken, by your first love.

You will never know how to hate.

I will never know why someone could be so evil and kill you cold blooded.

I will never know you personally

Yet I will never be able to forget you.

You are Lunek Milch, killed by cowards when you were age 3.

They buried you alive during a mass murder in your hometown of  Tłuste in 1943.

 

Source

Ancient Faces

 

 

 

The Dutch Churches protest.

KERK

I can’t deny the fact that the Dutch could have done more during WWII, and esepcially in relation to helping their Jewish fellow citizens.

But on the other hand it is easy for me to judge because I was never put in a situation where I had to choose between aiding a neighbor with a good chance of being harshly punished for it , or turning a blind eye.

There were however time where the Dutch openly spoke out against their occupiers, and as an unintended consequence, at least I believe it was, it brought the several Christian communities together.

Below is an English translation of a letter signed by the majority of all the Dutch churches which was published as a collective protest against the treatment of the country’s Jews:

“The undersigned Dutch Churches, already deeply shocked by the measures against the Jews in the Netherlands, which exclude them from participation in normal public life, were horrified to learn of new measures under which men, women, and children and entire families shall be deported to Reich territory and territories under Reich control. The suffering that this will inflict on tens of thousands, the knowledge that these measures are repugnant to the deepest moral consciousness of the Dutch people, and, above all, the violation inherent in these measures of the law and justice laid down by God, compel the Churches to address to you the most urgent plea not to implement these measures.

On behalf of the Christians among the Jews this urgent plea is enjoined on us by the additional consideration that by these measures they will be cut off from participation in the life of the Church.

The Dutch Reformed Church;

The Archbishop and Bishops of the Roman Catholic Church in the Netherlands;

The Calvinist Churches in the Netherlands;

The General Mennonite Sect;

The Remonstrant Brotherhood;

The Old Reformed Church in the Netherlands;

The Reformed Sect in the Netherlands;

The Evangelist Lutheran Church in the Netherlands;

The New Evangelist Lutheran Church in the Kingdom of the Netherlands.””

——————————————–

I am not sure when the letter was published but it must have been late 1940 or early 1941. It is good to note that any form of protest could lead to the death penalty.

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Sources

Protest of the Dutch Churches, during World War II, quoted in The Yellow Star: The Persecution of the Jews in Europe, 1933-1945, by Gerhard Schoenberner, at page 132. Online, courtesy Google Books.

Jewish Prisoner 2731. Auschwitz-1942.

2731

2731 was the inmate number given to this girl. Nothing else is known about her, except that it is very unlikely that she  survived.

My heart broke when I saw this picture. A life wiped out only a picture that remains. Not a picture of a young girl dressed in a gown. Or a picture of a young girl having fun. No name, only a number.

Dear young lady, I am a father of another young lady. You may not have a known name but I will designate a name for you. It is not a usual name, more a pledge, but you can use it. I call you My Prayer, for henceforth you will be in my prayers, until I take my last breath.

2731

2 Lives- One full of promise- One stolen life.

7 Days a week I’ll remember you.

3 Reasons to remember you. Your life;Your life disrupted, Your death.

1 Beautiful human being .

I am Fanny Cogan.

fanny

I am Fanny Cogan.

I was born on Saturday November 27,1937. Born in the city by the Seine, Paris, the city of love. And I was loved by those who knew me and saw me.

I was born on the same day as the revue Pins and Needles premiered at the Labor Stage Theatre on Broadway.

I am Fanny Cogan.

I was killed on December 9,1943 in Auschwitz. I was killed in a Gas chamber by people who hated me for no reason whatsoever. I was 6 , what did I do to them? I never met them before in my life. Killed, why?

I was killed on December 9,1943 the same day Edgar Allan Woolf, screenwriter who co-wrote the script for The Wizard of Oz died.

I am Fanny Cogan.

Despite the hate that killed me it is in love I will be remembered forever.

 

Source

Pinterest

Forevermissed.com

It would have been easy to turn a blind eye, but Fr.Lichtenberg didn’t.

Fr Lichtenberg

It would be so easy for ordinary citizens to turn a blind eye to the Holocaust, and indeed many did. I do not judge these people, because  faced with a similar situation I don’t know how I would react. Anyone who was critical against the Nazi regime, could face a prison sentence of worse death. And it really didn’t take that much to be sentenced to death. I can therefore understand why people ignored the things happening around them, for many it was a way to ensure survival.

There were those though how saw the injustice and evil and spoke out against it publicly. People like the Catholic Priest Fr. Bernhard Lichtenberg.

Ever since the Nazis came to power he spoke out against them. After the pogrom of November 9, 1938,known as Kristallnacht he said the following public prayer in the St. Hedwig’s Cathedral in Berlin.

cathredal

“We know what was yesterday. We do not know what will be tomorrow. But we have experienced what happened today. Outside, the Temple is burning. That is also a House of God.”

Lichtenberg  prayed publicly for the persecuted Jews at the daily Vespers service. Bishop Konrad von Preysing later entrusted Lichtenberg with the task of helping the Jewish community of the city, via the Welfare Office of the Berlin Diocesan Authority (“Hilfswerk”). In theory non-Aryan Christians were to be supported by the “Fund”. However  the aid was provided to every Jewish citizen who contacted the office.

Lichtenberg protested in person to Nazi officials against the arrest and killing of the sick and mentally ill.In 1941 he wrote a letter to the  chief physician of the Reich, Minister of Public Health Leonardo Conti, in relation to the T4 euthanasia program.

Conti

“I, as a human being, a Christian, a priest, and a German, demand of you, Chief Physician of the Reich, that you answer for the crimes that have been perpetrated at your bidding, and with your consent, and which will call forth the vengeance of the Lord on the heads of the German people.”

Initially the Nazis saw him more of a nuisance then a threat but his  efforts to help the Jews and his calls to put an end to the immoral actions of the Nazis grew stronger. To silence him, the Nazis arrested him on October 23, 1941, and was sentenced to 2 years in prison.But because of his unyielding opposition he was sent to Dachau. However he never reached Dachau.He collapsed and died while in transit, on 5 November 1943 in Hof, Bavaria.

BUST

He died for being a decent Human being , who spoke out about the evil he saw around him.

I am not a Catholic and I don’t believe in saints but of I had to believe in saints, he would be top of my list.

On 7 July 2004 Yad Vashem recognized Bernhard Lichtenberg as a Righteous Among the Nations.

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Sources

The Second World War: A Complete History

Bundesarchiv

Yad Vashem

 

Walk a mile in your shoes.

shoe

As the title might suggest I was trying to find some poetic sentences to describe this picture.

But I couldn’t,because the more I looked at the picture the less sense it made. In fact it made no sense to me at all.

What is the sense of keeping all these shoes? Were they meant as trophies? Of all the attire that one possesses , the shoes are the most personal items.Looking at my own feet, I am a size 13, additionally my feet are wide and high. No one could ever walk a mile in my shoes, no one but me anyway.

That brings me back to my questions, why keep these shoes? They will be useless to others because they won’t fit.

Looking at the picture I also realized that no one of us, except for those very few survivors, could ever walk a mile in these shoes, figuratively speaking. This picture represent a hate, not a hate borne out of dislike, but hate borne out of pure evil. A hate so great that millions were murdered. Millions and millions pairs of shoes left behind.They would walk never again.

And as I looked at a picture I thought, it makes no economical sense either, Millions killed out of pure hate, a hate that even jeopardized an economy. Millions of people who would never again buy new shoes,clothes,jewelry or furniture. Millions who would never ever again to their daily grocery shopping.

What makes someone hate his fellow human being so much that he or she is even willing to negatively affect his or her future prosperity.

As I said this hate was borne out of evil. Someone told me today that hate eats one from the inside. and that is true for hate borne out of dislike, however when the origin is evil the hate gets combined with ignorance. Of those who committed these millions of crimes it is sometimes said they were brainwashed and were following orders, but you only get brainwashed if you allow it. So few showed any remorse of what they did and even that remorse was not genuine. The majority had no issues with their conscience, killing came just as easy as eating an apple.

Looking at the picture it made no sense to me that there are still some who say the Holocaust never happened.

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

 

 

Anne Frank-Just an ordinary girl.

anne frank

On August 4,1944 a tip from a Dutch informer led the Gestapo to the now so well known secret annex in Amsterdam. Anne Frank, her family and all the other occupants would be arrested.

Via her diary Anne Frank became one of the  symbols  of the Holocaust. I often read people describing her diary and her letters as ‘works’ as if they weer professional pieces of literature. But they weren’t ,they were words of a young girl coming of age, in the most anxious of circumstances. That is what makes it so special and powerful.

She was just an ordinary girl, as some of the below excerpts written by her illustrate.

“I have pretty long hair … Papa and Mama want me to get it cut but I’d much rather let it grow”  “I have a little appliance in my mouth, and braces … Now I have to go to the dentist every week, and it comes out the next day. This has been going on for eight weeks, and I find it very unpleasant, of course.”— Taken from a letter to her Grandmother. Spring 1941.

“From Papa and Mama a bicycle, a new school bag, a beach dress and various other things.Margot gave me this stationery, because I had run out, and I didn’t do too badly on candies and other little presents either. It’s very warm here, is it warm there too?” From a letter to her Grandmother written in June 1941, shortly after her birthday.

“It’s really a wonder that I haven’t dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into wilderness. I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too. I can feel the suffering of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again”. from her diary July 15, 1944.

” Believe me, I’d like to listen, but it doesn’t work, because if I’m quiet and serious, everyone thinks I’m putting on a new act and I have to save myself with a joke, and then I’m not even talking about my own family, who assume I must be ill, stuff me with aspirins and sedatives, feel my neck and forehead to see if I have a temperature, ask about my bowel movements and berate me for being in a bad mood, until I just can’t keep it up any more, because when everybody starts hovering over me, I get cross, then sad, and finally end up turning my heart inside out, the bad part on the outside and the good part on the inside, and keep trying to find a way to become what I’d like to be and what I could be if … if only there were no other people in the world.” Her last diary entry August 1, 1944.

poem

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Sources

CNN

Washington Post

Smithsonian

Learntoquestion.com

Yahoo News

 

Death is just a heartbeat away.

last

The title is a line from a song by Gary Moore and Phil Lynott called “Out in the Fields”. Although the song has nothing to do with the Holocaust, the particular line though I used for the title, was a reality for millions.

Millions who were murdered for no reason but hate and a warped sense of superiority by the perpetrators.

There is no way that we can compare any of the ways used to slaughter these innocent lives. All the manners of execution were unfathomable. Be it the executions of the Einsatzgruppen, or the use of dynamite to experiment more efficient ways of killing or any of the other ways.

One method of extermination  stands out above all others, and that  was the mass killing in the Gas chambers. It was believed for a long time that the victims died quickly , but in fact it could sometimes take up to half an hour before they would die.

It only makes sense that the young and healthy would suffer longest in the Gas chambers.

Aside from the killing their last dignity was taken away from them before they entered the Gas chambers. They were told they were going to be showered and deloused and were ordered to strip naked, not in a private cubicle , but together with everyone else who were about to enter the “Showers”. Even that last bit of privacy and dignity was stolen from them, regardless what age they were.

Millions of last heart beats.

I have to believe though,that after they died they went to a better place. Although I am a reasonably religious man, this sentiment doesn’t have much to do with religion but more with spirituality. I have to believe this because if I knew they didn’t go to a better place, I just could not cope with that and would drive me insane. However that is my feeling on it and I fully appreciate and respect others thinking differently about that.

Gaschamber

 

Source of pictures

Yad Vashem

 

 

Boy to Man-a Boy in a striped pajamas

pajamas

Dear Iwan Rebałka, this is your date which is used to male up your statistics.

Born -February 6, 1925 in Kreis Krasnopilla, Russland—an area which is now the part of Ukraine.

Religion – Greek Orthodox

Job at time of arrest-Milkman

Deported to Auschwitz – August 20, 1942

Assigned number – 60308 marked as political prisoner. Red triangle.

Date of death -1 March 1943

Claimed Cause of death-perinephric abscess.

But you are not just data, You are a human being. Technically you were a man for 23 days, for just over 3 weeks you were a man. But an evil regime did not allow you to become a man. They arrested you for no apparent reason, you were seen as a lesser person. The called you a political prisoner.An enemy of the state. But whose state? It certainly wasn’t theirs, because they invaded and occupied your country. They were the enemy of your state.

You were only a young milkman trying to make a living.

They killed you by injecting a a phenol into your heart.

You just made it to manhood but really you were just an innocent boy ,dressed in a striped pajamas.