Cruel and humiliating.

Himmler, Seyss-Inquart and Rauter decided to set an example: the first roundup against Jews became a fact. On Saturday afternoon, February 22, 1941, a column of German trucks appeared near Waterlooplein. The area was completely cordoned off. Young Jewish men were ruthlessly herded together on Jonas Daniël Meijerplein,in Amsterdam. Also on the following day many Jewish men were arrested. A total of 427 Jews between the ages of twenty and thirty-five were deported to the Schoorl camp.

It wasn’t enough to just round them up and deport them. The Nazis also felt the need to humiliate at least one of the young men. One German M.P. (Grüne Polizei) is seen to be dealing a blow in a man’s face. In front of his friends and family.

The men captured during the round up were transported in an army truck to the concentration camp Schoorl. The group of 427 people only stayed for four days after which they were deported to Buchenwald, where in June 1941 they were subsequently deported to Mauthausen concentration camp. Only two of this group survived the war.

It wasn’t enough for the Nazis to be cruel, they also had to humiliate.

source

Love during the Holocaust

History of Sorts

Getting married is one of the most wonderful things that can happen to you in life. It is a union of love which is quite powerful.

However it can also be nerve wrecking, admittedly more so for the bride then the groom. You want to make sure the day goes well, you hope the weather will be good and that the guests won’t complain too much. And of course then there is that all important wedding night, you may have made love before, but the wedding night is just that bit more special , and you may just want to be a bit more adventurous when it comes to sex.

Now go back to the period of 1940-1945. Your country has been occupied by a foreign power, helped by some of those you once may have known as friends or neighbours.

The Nazis who want to eradicate everyone like you…

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T4

History of Sorts

September 1,1939 is well known for the German invasion of Poland, triggering World War 2. However it is less known as the date that the official killing of disabled people was made law, albeit it under the guise of euthanasia.

It was only 5 lines which determined the fate of hundreds of thousands.

“Reichsleiter Bouhler and Dr. med. Brandt are hereby instructed and authorized to broaden the powers of designated physicians to the extent that persons who are suffering from diseases which may be deemed incurable according to standards of human judgment based on a careful examination of their condition shall be guaranteed a mercy death.”

— Adolf Hitler, Memorandum Authorizing Involuntary Euthanasia, Berlin, 1 September 1939.”

It is of course easy to put all the blame on the Nazi regime, however something which is often overlooked is that the 1st victim was on request by the parents of the child…

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Karl Amadeus Hartmann-Protesting against the Nazi regime through Music

Today marks the 117th birthday of Karl Amadeus Hartmann.He

was born on 2 August 1905 in Munich and came into contact with art and music at an early stage. He studied trombone and composition at the Staatliche Akademie der Tonkunst in Munich from 1924 to 1929.

He hated Nazism and Hitler and anything that ranked of extreme socialism and communism. A fellow composer ,Udo Zimmermann, said about Hartmann “His concept of life oriented towards humanity is inscribed in all his scores. A warning in view of the atrocities of this world, but also resistance from the heart: a revocation of the spirits, love and life.”

His compositions were often politically charged, as Hartmann was a socialist who staunchly opposed the Nazis and fascism. During World War II, Hartmann half-poisoned himself to avoid military conscription.

He voluntarily withdrew completely from musical life in Germany during the Nazi era, while remaining in Germany, and refused to allow his works to be played there. An early symphonic poem, Miserae (1933–1934, first performed in Prague, 1935) was condemned by the Nazi regime but his work continued to be performed, and his fame grew, abroad. A number of Hartmann’s compositions show the profound effect of the political climate. His Miserae (1933–34) was dedicated to his ‘friends…who sleep for all eternity; we do not forget you (Dachau, 1933–34)’, referring to Dachau Concentration Camp, and was condemned by the Nazis. His piano sonata 27 April 1945 is about the thousands of prisoners from Dachau, whom Hartmann witnessed being led away from Allied forces at the end of the war.

Just three days before the liberation of the Dachau camp, the SS forces about 7,000 prisoners on a death march from Dachau south to Tegernsee. During the six-day death march, anyone who cannot keep up or continue is shot. Many others die of exposure, hunger, or exhaustion. American forces liberate the Dachau concentration camp on April 29, 1945. In early May 1945, American troops liberate the surviving prisoners from the death march to Tegernsee.

Solly Ganor, a survivor said about the march.

“we could see the furtive parting of curtains as German civilians peered out at us. To our surprise a few of them came out and tried to offer us some bread, but the result was disastrous. Hundreds of starving inmates would descend on the benefactor, often knocking him or her down. The bread was immediately torn to pieces, and the guards set upon the mob. Each time this happened several more bodies were left by the side of the road.”

After the fall of the Nazi regime, Hartmann was one of the few prominent surviving anti-fascists in Bavaria whom the postwar Allied administration could appoint to a position of responsibility. In 1945, he became a dramaturge at the Bavarian State Opera and there, as one of the few internationally recognized figures who had survived untainted by any collaboration with the Nazi regime, he became a vital figure in the rebuilding of (West) German musical life. Perhaps his most notable achievement was the Musica Viva concert series, which he founded and ran for the rest of his life in Munich.

He died on December 5,1963 in Munich.

Although Hartmann is one of the greatest German composers of the 20th century, he is forgotten about in the English speaking world.

sources

https://holocaustmusic.ort.org/politics-and-propaganda/hartmann-karl-amadeus/

https://archive.ph/20130104153710/http://www.schott-music.com/shop/persons/featured/8399/index.html#selection-559.0-559.208

Hanna Van de Voort -Forgotten Hero

Limburg is the most southern province in the Netherlands(there is also a province with that name in Belgium). It was one of the first places to be liberated in the Netherlands. By the end of September 1944 all of the province was liberated.

Hanna Van de Voort was a woman who was born in Meerlo, in the North of Limburg.

During the Second World War Hanna Van de Voort was a maternity nurse in Tienray in Limburg. Encouraged by her mother Marie. Hanna,together with 22-year-old student Nico Dohmen and Kurt Loewenstein in hiding, gave 123 Jewish children a place to go into hiding between 1943 and 1944. It mainly concerned children who were smuggled out of the Hollandsche Schouwburg in Amsterdam, where Jews were gathered for deportation. Almost all of the children were smuggled away by Piet Meerburg’s student resistance group.

The children usually stayed at Van de Voort’s home for a few days, where they were taught Catholic doctrine and about the street plan of Rotterdam. It was made that these children had been orphaned by the bombing of Rotterdam in 1940. All children were given a pseudonym and an identity card from the Central Bureau for Children’s Evacuation from bombed Rotterdam.

After a few days they were placed with farming families in the area. The children were regularly transferred to new locations if they were in danger of being discovered. ‘Aunt Hanna’ and especially ‘Uncle Nico’ – as they were called – kept in touch with the hiders and supported them by encouraging them to persevere. The foster parents received monetary compensation, clothing and footwear. The necessary vouchers for clothing and food came from Amsterdam.

The van Geffen family was one of the foster families. Sometimes things were even difficult to explain to their own children, below is an account of one of the van Geffen’s children.

“Maria was the eldest of the family. Her father was a strict Catholic, with a strong sense of social justice, he owned a shoe store in Tienray. He was active in the resistance as a courier of a resistance paper. Maria initially did not like it that a Jewish girl, named Floortje de Paauw, had been included in the family. So she told the story that the Jews nailed Jesus to the cross. Floortje took revenge by walking on the bleach with her shoes on the white laundry. Eventually It all worked out between those two. There was also a Jewish boy in the family: Daniël Jozeph Cohen, pseudonym Wim Dorn. He survived the war. Floortje participated in everything, went to school and to church. Maria remembers exactly how the Nazis lifted Floortje from bed during the children’s raid in Tienray in the night of July 31 to Aug 1, 1944. She had to dress Floortje. After a big hug, Floortje said to Maria: “I’m not coming back.” She was killed on 6 September 1944 in Auschwitz. After the war, it was hardly talked about at home.”

After a betrayal by Lucien Nahon, a Dutch Nazi, a raid was carried out. In the night of July 31 to August 1, 1944, raids take place on several hiding places that Lucien has provided.

During these children’s raids , Jewish children in hiding were arrested.The employees of the Eindhoven State Police and their helpers in Tienray and surrounding villages carried out the action. At least five children were arrested and deported to Auschwitz. Four of them were murdered in Auschwitz.

Floortje de Paauw (15-12-1933), Wim de Paauw (17-12-1934), Louis van Wezel (16-5-1936) en Dick van Wezel (6-3-1934).

Hanna van der Voort was also arrested during this raid.She was tortured to give information about the resistance, but she gave them nothing. She was released after nine days. Van de Voort suffered permanent damage to her health. She died in July 26,1956.

sources

https://www.oorlogsbronnen.nl/thema/Kinderrazzia%20Noord-Limburg

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Jewish Lyceum:September 1-1941 to April 7-1943

A picture like this I find nearly as disturbing as a picture of piles of dead bodies. It is not the image itself, but the knowledge of what happened to most if not all of the people in the picture.

The majority of them are young, healthy people, still in the prime of their lives.

It is a picture of pupils and teachers of the Jewish Lyceum in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, taken in July 1942.

On August 16, 1941, the Nazis ordered that all schools in the Netherlands had to submit a list of the names of the Jewish students. The parents were then told that their children were no longer welcome in the new school year. The situation at the Sint-Janslyceum was striking. On September 11, 1941, Rector J. Bauwens wrote to the secretary of OMO in Tilburg: ‘I hereby inform you that no Jewish students are enrolled or have been registered for the Sint-Janslyceum’. While according to the data from the Department of Education in The Hague, the lyceum should have four Jewish students.

Students of the Jewish Lyceum wearing a Yellow star

In the Netherlands there had been little opposition to the expulsion of Jewish students. Nine Jewish secondary schools were established across the country. All children from the area (Bommelerwaard, Eindhoven, Tilburg, Breda and Oss) were accommodated at the Joodsch Lyceum in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. The school had only been operating for a few months. In January and February of 1942, classes were no longer held “because of coal scarcity” and the constant cold. In April 1943 all students and teachers in Dutch camps were locked up, deported or went into hiding. As a result, the school formally ceased to exist.

75% of all Dutch Jews were murdered during the Holocaust. It is therefore same to presume that the majority of these children and their teachers were murdered.

sources

https://www.4en5mei.nl/oorlogsmonumenten/zoeken/2617/s-hertogenbosch-plaquette-op-het-voormalige-joodsch-lyceum

https://www.tracesofwar.nl/sights/12331/Joods-Lyceum-en-Plaquette-Den-Bosch.htm#:~:text=Het%20Joodse%20Lyceum%20in%20’s,gedeporteerd%20of%20ze%20doken%20onder.

Murdered in Mauthausen October 10 1941

History of Sorts

Below is a list of names of random people. They only had 3 things in common. They lived in the Netherlands at the time of arrest. They were Jewish. They were al murdered today 80 years ago in Mauthausen, only for the reason that they were Jewish.

Fritz Rothstein

Born in Breslau, 10 August 1921 –Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Mozes Swelheim

Born in Almelo, 20 January 1903 – Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Barend Salli Menko

Born in Delden, 17 July 1918 – Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Erich Reinsberg

Born in Hemer, 11 January 1909 –Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Salomon Zwaaf

Born in Amsterdam, 2 September 1908 – Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Ruben David Löwenstein

Born in Oldenzaal, 7 December 1909 –Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Arnold Groenteman

Born in Amsterdam, 29 April 1914 –Murdered in Mauthausen, 10 October 1941

Hans Richter

Born…

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1740 Batavia massacre

History of Sorts

The Netherlands has for most of its history quite a prosperous country. I wish I could say that all this wealth was always begotten in a fair way, but that would be a lie. The Dutch were ruthless in their quest for the things they desired.

From the arrival of the first Dutch ships in the late 16th century, to the declaration of independence in 1945, Dutch control over the Indonesian archipelago was always tenuous. Although Java was dominated by the Dutch, many areas remained independent throughout much of this time, including Aceh, Bali, Lombok and Borneo. There were numerous wars and disturbances across the archipelago as various indigenous groups resisted efforts to establish a Dutch hegemony, which weakened Dutch control and tied up its military forces. Piracy remained a problem until the mid-19th century. Finally in the early 20th century, imperial dominance was extended across what was to become…

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ROCKTOBER- Child in Time

History of Sorts

As you can see I renamed October to ROCKTOBER- Throughout the month I shall be posting classic Rock songs and the stories behind them. Starting with Deep Purple’s “Child in Time”

It is the 3rd track on the a side of Deep Purple’s classic 1970 album “Deep Purple in Rock”

Deep Purple’s Ian Gillan has said that “Child in Time” is based on It’s a Beautiful Day’s psychedelic song “Bombay Calling”.

It’s a Beautiful Day in return borrowed Purple’s “Wring That Neck” and turned it into “Don and Dewey” on their second album Marrying Maiden (1970). The song started with organist Jon Lord playing “Bombay Calling”, which the band then re-arranged and changed the structure. Gillan had never heard the original song, and created lyrics about the Cold War to fit the music, later saying it “reflected the mood of the moment”. The band then worked out instrumental lines to…

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Star Wars -Black Angel.

History of Sorts

For all of you die hard Star Wars fans who think that you have seen all movies in the Star Wars universe, more then likely you have not.

A long time ago in a galaxy not so far away, in fact this galaxy.

The 1980 short film was created to accompany The Empire Strikes Back in theaters. It was the directorial debut of Star Wars‘ pioneering set decorator Roger Christian and a special request by the big man himself, George Lucas. After it screened in cinemas, it suddenly vanished.

A popular Lucas-approved short that was in some markets aired in theaters as a companion piece to Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back in 1980.

The plot

“Sir Maddox, a knight returning from the Crusades, finds his village and keep destroyed by unknown attackers. Most of the inhabitants are dead, including his family, and the few that did survive…

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