The testimony of Edith Birkin (née Hofmann)

Edith Hofmann was born in Prague in 1927; in 1941, aged 14, she was sent with her family to the Lodz ghetto in Poland. Her parents died within their first year there. When the Lodz ghetto was liquidated in 1944, Birkin was sent to the concentration camp at Auschwitz where she spent the rest of her time there working in an underground munitions factory.

After the war she moved to the UK. She went to Belfast by boat to visit her sister; attended high school in Derry. There was a Jewish community there. She followed a teachers’ training course in London. After that she worked in Hendon and Edgware. She married in 1962 to a non-Jewish man,they were unable to have children so they adopted two boys, and a girl. In the 1970s she studied A-level History of Modern Art and went on to take a course in fine art.

Following are some excerpts of her testimonies.

About the life in the ghettos

“So when you came to the ghetto there was this dreadful dreadful smell. It was in the winter, and it was freezing, and you could smell rotten cabbages and beetroot; there was this smell of beetroot. And what we were given was beetroot soup, which I couldn’t eat at first, it was so awful. It wasn’t a sort of good beetroot soup, it was terrible beetroot soup, it was just water with bits of beetroot swimming in it. And I couldn’t eat it for a few days, but then I was so hungry I ate it and didn’t get enough of it. Or it was cabbage soup made of rotted cabbage, and I think we got a loaf of bread a week, and I think a little bit of sugar we got sometimes. And then we got what they called coffee, it was just a sort of brown water, it wasn’t really coffee, and with that you cleaned your teeth and did everything. Another thing I remember on that first day is that cart where they picked up the dead people, you know, when people died they came and collected all the dead people from the rooms, or out in the street, and just shoved them onto this sort of, like a cart, took them away. And people standing outside wailing you know, if a relative died, and get these people to collect them and they stood out there, wailing. It was very very frightening, because people didn’t do that in Czechoslovakia, all this wailing and moaning and shouting and crying and screaming, all that. That was our first day in the ghetto. It was a very very severe winter, and people didn’t have fuel, they didn’t have food enough. They got diseases, they got typhus and typhoid and dysentery and all kinds of diseases. And lots and lots of them died, thousands of people. We… there were a lot of children my own age whom I knew in that same building, and we did sort of… we found a place in the, there was a sort of attic, and we used to gather in the attic sort of place, sing songs and make up plays, and talk, and played games, you know, all kinds of games. And amused ourselves. We never went out for a walk together somehow, for some reason, but I remember being in that attic and singing and dancing a bit, and making our own amusement. In the spring then we used to go for walks; there was a place just outside the ghetto, but it was still in the ghetto you know, it was in the boundary of the ghetto, but it was like a sort of wasteground, there weren’t any houses, and occasionally there was a tree, because I remember trying to eat the bark of it, to see if one could eat it, which you couldn’t. And there were a few trees, yes. So we used to go there, and through the barbed wires you could see a bit of countryside, so we had walks in the spring.”

About Auschwitz

“When we arrived in Auschwitz we all had to get out, and then you had the Doctor there who selected us, who looked at people, and when he saw that you might be useful for work you went one side, and if you were old or ill looking you went the other side, the women were somewhere else and the men were somewhere else, the children were with the women. All different groups of people. And luckily I went with the young and so-called healthy women. I made myself big and tall and strong, soon realised you know it was probably wise to do. So I went with these girls, they weren’t really women they were young girls. I think anybody over twenty had it, you know, because they didn’t need that many for work. So, from what I remember, nobody was over thirty; I never met anybody over thirty after that.”

“Of course we soon realised that there was this big chimney, you know, out of which came a lot of smoke, and the sky was red, the sky was red all the time. And you know, when we asked what it is they told us, and we couldn’t believe it. Well the Germans didn’t tell us, but other prisoners told us you know. ‘What’s this, what’s this smoke, what’s this fire, you know, why is the sky so red?’ What is this all about, you know, we couldn’t understand. But then we were told, very soon we were told you know, and we saw these transports of people coming; they came past us because there was this Lagerstrasse, you know, this road that was going to the gas chamber, from the train, and they came past. All these transports came past us, you know, thousands and thousands of people. And they never appeared again, they just disappeared into this building, you know. Somehow you know, you just got used to it; you were there. It’s more terrifying thinking back on it now, in a way, than then. Again, they said you know, they’re giving us bromide in the soup to keep us calm. But things were so bad, and you lost everybody, that it was just another blow, you know, you just got sort of immune to these things.”

“Auschwitz was very frightening in a certain extent, because it was full of Germans. Because until then we didn’t see a lot of Germans in the ghetto, only occasionally. It was full of Germans and the Germans with dogs, and there were these barbed wires, with electricity in it you know. Discipline, very strict discipline. This feeling of death, all these people going in the gas chamber. It was a very weird place, very weird place. With this atmosphere of death all the time you know, and this unbelievable situation of people being… you could smell, you could smell these people being burnt. All the time you smelt this… it was a little bit like you know, when people used to boil glue, it was the bones that smelt like glue. You had volunteers who would go with the Germans you know, and get a bit of food, and they were what was called the kapo, and the block leader you know. Because every of these huts, it was a block, which was called a block, had a block leader who had a little cubicle all to herself, with the women a woman and with the men a man. Because there were only women in our block, we were separated then from the men, so the men had men and the women had women. And it was like a glass cubicle, so they could see us. And you could recognise them because they were not starved, you know, they looked normal in their faces, in their bodies, they weren’t hungry, they had enough to eat, and they had reasonable clothes on, they had good clothes on. So, you knew who they were, and they were very sadistic and very cruel, and they treated us, the other prisoners, very very badly. They were prisoners like us, but they had privileged positions you see.”

sources

https://www.bl.uk/learning/histcitizen/voices/testimonies/edith/birkin4/atmosphereofdeath.html

https://sounds.bl.uk/Oral-history/Jewish-Holocaust-survivors/021M-C0410X0030XX-0500V0

Hedwig Klement

hedwig

Hedwig Klement  just a random name on random suitcase. But this random suitcase is not just any suitcase.

It tells the story of a woman forcefully uprooted from her home in Prague. All she could take with her was this suitcase.

That suitcase is all that remains of her because she was killed in Auschwitz. Reduced to some kind of serial number ,1311, and her birth date October 8,1898. She was 46 when she was murdered.

Hedwig Klement, just a random name of a random person.Also known as Hedvika Klemperer.

But Hedwig was not a random person

She was the Daughter of Wilhelm Wolf Klemperer and Eleonora Laura Klemperer.

The Sister of  Egon Klemperer; Franziska Klement and Leo Klemperer.

Wife of Egon Cohen Klement

Mother of Tomáš Klement

I could post a picture of Hedwig or write bio’s of each of her family members. But I will not do that, I am giving you all that task to find a picture of Hedwig and find information on her family. Because if we all truly start looking into the personal lives of those who were killed we can only start getting a slight bit of notion and what we have lost. Only then we can truly say Never Again or Never Forget of we do not actively research and just read stories that are dished out to us, we will remember only a short time.

It is the responsibility of all of us never ever to allow names to be written on suitcases again.

The singing stopped but the voice remains.

magda

When a nation destroys its own culture it does a lot more then destroying  the cultural fabric , it also destroys the soul of the nation, especially when it comes to the musical cultural heritage. When it murders the artist who perform this cultural legacy, a part of that soul will be lost forever.

Magda Spiegel  was a German contralto, who was born in Prague in the now Czech republic, she was a member of the Frankfurt Opera ensemble and was murdered in the Auschwitz concentration camp.

One Of her best known performances was that of Adriano in Wagner’s Rienzi ,when the Frankfurt opera company visited the Netherlands in 1934, according Peter Hugh Reed in The American Record Guide  .

The irony (for lack of a better word) was that Wagner was Hitler’s favourite composer.

Magda Spiegel

Although Magda was killed in the gas chambers and her body was burned, her voice was preserved in several recordings.

Physically the singing was stopped but her voice remains.

 

Donation

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Sources

Opera Arias.com

Find a Grave

Operanostalgia.be

 

 

Nine executions-International students day.

Protest

On  October ,28 1939, students from the  Charles University in Prague held a demonstration to remember the 21st anniversary of the independence of the Republic of Czechoslovakia. The demonstration was violently suppressed  by the occupying Nazi regime more then a dozen  students were seriously injured, one of the students  Jan Opletal later died of his bullet wounds on November 11,1939.

Four days later on November 15 1939 he was laid out and driven through Prague. Over  3,000 students were at the memorial event at the Institute of Pathology and the adjacent chapel.

funreal

The protectorate’s government had surprisingly given permission for the funeral procession. The event however quickly turned into another an anti-Nazi demonstration.

As a result, Reichsprotektor Konstantin von Neurath, the Nazi chief of  the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, initiated the so-called Sonderaktion Prag on the 17th of  November 1939. All Czech universities and colleges were closed , and 1,850 students were arrested .Eight students  and one professor who had been deemed the leaders of the demonstration, were executed.

  1. Josef Matoušek (historian and associate professor.
  2. Jaroslav Klíma (law student and Chairman of the National Association of Czech Students in Bohemia and Moravia.)
  3. Jan Weinert (student of Bohemistics and Germanics.)
  4. Josef Adamec (law student and secretary of the National Association of Czech Students in Bohemia and Moravia)
  5. Jan Černý (student of medicine)
  6. Marek Frauwirth (student of economics; as an employee of the Slovak embassy in Prague)
  7. Bedřich Koula (law student and secretary of the Association of Czech students in Bohemia)
  8. Václav Šafránek (student of architecture and record-keeper of the National Association of Czech Students in Bohemia and Moravia)
  9. František Skorkovský (law student and Director of a Committee of the Confédération Internationale des Étudiants, Chairman of the Foreign Department of the National Association of Czech Students in Bohemia and Moravia)

funeral

Hitler authorised the execution without trial of the 9 protest leaders, and made it a policy to use force even for small gatherings.

If there were any further demonstrations, Hitler promised to “flatten” Prague.

1,200 students  were sent to concentration camps.

On the 50th anniversary demonstrations were held in Bratislava and Prague which eventually led to the Velvet revolution and the election of  artist Václav Havel as President on 29 December 1989.

November 17 is now also designated as International Students day, but if I see what some students protest or complain about nowadays I wonder if they are aware of the sacrifices made of the students in Prague in 1939.

 

Donation

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Sources

Radio Prague

Students EU

 

Moody Blues-Prague in White Satin

Moody Blues

You’re an immensely popular Rock-Blues band and you have been invited to one of the Warsaw pact countries,Czechoslovakia to be precise.

They just got a new leader a man with a vision,a prelude to glasnost as such. Alexander Dubček opened it up his country for new cultural experiences, so when the Moody Blues got a chance to play a gig behind the iron curtain of course they took it with both hands, After all what could go wrong? They had the blessing of the supreme leader.

Dubcek

Well it was August 20,1968 the day that the Soviet Union and the other Warsaw Pact nations decided they did not like these new liberties introduced by Mr Dubček and decided to end this party nick named the Prague spring and took control of this unruly situation.

Tanks

The band did get a chance to shoot a promo for a French TV show the video  was shot in the afternoon . As The Moody Blues played their hit song, Warsaw Pact troops were already preparing for an invasion. By the evening, it had begun, and the British Embassy took no chances and quickly withdrew the band members from the city. Justin Hayward recalled in an interview: “We were in Czechoslovakia when the Russians rolled in. The British Air Force very kindly got us out, and it wasn’t until we got back to England that we realized what was going on.”

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I am passionate about my site and I know you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

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