World War 2 heart break. -But in a positive way.

1

There are so many images of death and destruction during WWII, Images of dying children or children that already have been killed.

Images of families torn apart not knowing if they will ever see each other again, But the amazing thing though, amidst all of these portrayals of the abyss there are some pictures that will break your heart,but in a positive way. Pictures like the one above where a little girl gives a soldier a kiss on Valentine’s day 1945 in France.

Maybe I should say they will melt your heart, but either way I will have no doubt that these will bring tears to your eyes.

A volunteer who saved and comforts a baby after a bombing in London.

2

An American soldier kissing a little Italian girl

3

American soldier cleaning the face of a young french orphan.

4

A British soldier gives soup to a little French girl in Caen

5

US soldiers talking to the only French girl left in Cerisy-la-salle, France after the Allied invasion of Normandy. July 25, 1944

6

Soviet soldier returning home to greet his daughter.

7

Guardsman returning to duty after being home on leave kisses his little son in 1941

8

Two Dutch kids get some much needed food from an allied soldier (Jan 1st, 1945)

9

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Sources

Pinterest

Tumblr

 

Advertisements

Arbeit Macht Frei

1

Even if you don’t know any German you will know what those 3 words mean. Arbeit macht Frei- Work will set you free.

3 simple words which had such a great impact. The Nazis turned these words, which when you look at them basically had an honorable intend, into the most despicable words ever uttered.

They gave a false sense of hope to those who arrived at the concentration camps and death camps. For it made them believe if they would work hard  and do as their were told they would be set free.

3

Many didn’t even get to see those words over the gates for they had already perished on the transport to Auschwitz,Dachau or any of the other camps.

Arbeit macht Frei where it should have said “Hier wirst du sterben” -Here you will die.

2

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Remaining strong

men

I am a parent and my job like any other parent’s job on the globe is to keep my children safe from harm or at least reduce the risk of harm in whatever way possible.

That is an extremely difficult job in normal circumstances.During the Holocaust this was often impossible. I can understand that parents then would try anything to safe their children, but I can’t fathom the anxiety and fear they had,whilst re-assuring their kids, giving them hope where they knew there was no hope to be given.

Below are pictures of families with parents who tried to do an impossible job, giving hope and tried to remain strong for their children.

I don’t know who these parents were all I know is they were heroes

Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-N0827-318,_KZ_Auschwitz,_Ankunft_ungarischer_Juden

Rose-Goteiner-Family-photo

Prewar portrait of a Belgian Jewish family.

RetrieveAsset

Portrait of members of a Hungarian Jewish family. They were deported to and killed in Auschwitz soon after this photo was taken.

07606

Portrait of a French Jewish family wearing Jewish stars.

RetrieveAsset (1)

Jewish family wearing the Star of David. The family would soon be gassed by the nazis.

9480f8fce677026b4a66a2f4b8ab30a6--being-a-mother-never-forget

Virginia and Bundi Liona with Three of their Six Children. The Family Perished in Auschwitz in 1943

3085

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Alive! How far would you go to survive?

14691004_196752380748380_7578947752359778309_n

Anyone who has seen the movie ‘Alive’ will be aware of this story.
Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 was a chartered flight carrying 45 people, including a rugby union team, their friends, family and associates, that crashed in the Andes on Friday the 13th  October 1972, in an incident known as the Andes flight disaster and, in the Hispanic world and South America, as the Miracle of the Andes (El Milagro de los Andes). More than a quarter of the passengers died in the crash and several others quickly succumbed to cold and injury. Of the 27 who were alive a few days after the accident, another eight were killed by an avalanche that swept over their shelter in the wreckage. The last 16 survivors were rescued on 23 December 1972, more than two months after the crash.

05ihadtosurvive.adapt.1190.1
The survivors had little food and no source of heat in the harsh conditions at over 3,600 metres (11,800 ft) altitude. Faced with starvation and radio news reports that the search for them had been abandoned, the survivors fed on the bodies of dead passengers that had been preserved in the snow. Rescuers did not learn of the survivors until 72 days after the crash when passengers Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa, after a 10-day trek across the Andes, found Chilean arriero Sergio Catalán,who gave them food and then alerted the authorities to the existence of the other survivors.

crash_photo_by_antonio_caruso_el_pais_montevideo_a

The survivors had a small amount of food: a few chocolate bars, assorted snacks, and several bottles of wine. During the days following the crash, they divided up this food in very small amounts to make their meager supply last as long as possible. Fito Strauch devised a way to obtain water by using metal from the seats and placing snow on it. The snow melted in the sun and dripped into empty wine bottles..

Even with this strict rationing, their food stock dwindled quickly. There were no natural vegetation or animals on the snow-covered mountain.

The group survived by collectively deciding to eat flesh from the bodies of their dead comrades. This decision was not taken lightly, as most of the dead were classmates, close friends, or even relatives.

All of the passengers were Roman Catholic.  Some rationalized the act of necrotic cannibalism as equivalent to the ritual of Holy Communion,

Ecce_Agnus_Dei

or justified it according to a Bible verse (John 15:13): “no man hath greater love than this: that he lay down his life for his friends”). Others initially had reservations, though after realizing that it was their only means of staying alive, changed their minds a few days later. There are reports that the only surviving female passenger, Liliana, although not seriously injured in the crash, was the last survivor to initially refuse eating the human flesh due to her strong religious convictions. She later began eating after being convinced by her husband, Javier, and the other survivors – though she died shortly thereafter in the avalanche.

When first rescued, the survivors initially explained that they had eaten some cheese they had carried with them, planning to discuss the details in private with their families. They were pushed into the public eye when photos were leaked to the press and sensational articles were published.

The survivors held a press conference on 28 December at Stella Maris College in Montevideo, where they recounted the events of the past 72 days.(Over the years, they also participated in the publication of two books, two films, and an official website about the event.)

The rescuers and a Chilean priest later returned to the crash site and buried the bodies of the dead, 80 m (260 ft) from the aircraft. Close to the grave they built a stone pile with an iron cross. They doused the remains of the fuselage in gasoline and set it alight.

1280x720-ivy

Although it is a horrific story, ultimately it is a great tale of hope,faith and endurance.

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

The caring side of WWII- A glimmer of Hope

25834665082_4df42bfd9a_b

It wasn’t only doom and gloom during WWII. Occasionally there were moments of hope and care. Amidst the darkest and horrific era of human history, humanity shone through.

I will leave the pictures do the talking, most of these were taken around D-Day.

23542835945_469e03746b_b

There is always time for a drink.

22839230932_8a9d6f50a1_b

And chocolate

21877808918_424d514107_b

 

New hope and new life

17365846095_47343c241a_b

Time for a sing song and entertainment.

14915339392_b5522779ac_b

Picnic

picnic

Actors dressed as cowboys as part of the Canadian Army Invasion Revue in Banville on July 30, 1944. (Photo: Conseil Régional de Basse-Normandie / National Archives of Canada)

cowbos

Pfc Joseph E. Day (of Belloire, Ohio) holds a puppy named “Invasion” in a German helmet. Photo taken on July 14, 1944.

dog

Gratitude

thanks

Paule M. Truffert among civilians in Cherbourg. According to LIFE, she was the only girl in town who spoke English.

english

A woman stretches to give a bottle of water to a member of the 4th US Armored Division as they cross Le Repas

tank

Members of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, Sergeant T.F Mc Feat and Private J. Viner, administer plasma to a victim.

plasma

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00

Perseverance during the Holocaust

finger-pointing-holocaust-photos

For me it is unfathomable to even imagine what the victims of the Holocaust had to endure. I don’t think I would have the strength to persevere and yet there were those who did. They did not give up hope and just kept going.

Below are just some pictures of those who despite everything looked evil in the eye and bravely fought for their lives.

Prisoners of the Dachau concentration camp cheer the approaching U.S. troops, April 1945.

dachau-liberation

Child survivors of the Auschwitz concentration camp soon after its liberation by Soviet forces in January 1945.

children-fence

Polish prisoners of the Dachau concentration camp toast their U.S. liberators circa April/May 1945.

smiling-prisoners

A Hungarian prisoner of the Dachau concentration camp not long after its liberation by U.S. troops in April 1945.

older-male-prisoner

Malnourished forced laborers of the Buchenwald concentration camp near Jena, Germany soon after the arrival of liberating U.S. troops in April 1945.

starved-prisoner-men

Prisoners of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp cheerfully collect bread rations upon their liberation by British forces in April 1945.

liberated-women

 

Hanukkah during the Holocaust

hanukah-11

I have heard and read a lot of Holocaust survivor stories and the one thing they all had in common was that they never gave up hope.

I think that is a greater feat then the actual survival. How can you keep hope when you see your family and friends being taken away or being slaughtered in front of your own eyes.Or knowing that they will be killed soon.

trblinka

At the Treblinka extermination camp it would only take 30 minutes from the train arriving to death in the gas chambers.And yet there were those who held on to their faith and kept hope.

I don’t know too much about Hanukkah. I know it’s the the Jewish Festival of Light and it remembers the rededication of the second Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. (Hanukkah is the Jewish word for ‘dedication’.) Hanukkah last for eight days and starts on the 25th of Kislev, the month in the Jewish calendar that occurs at about the same time as December.

During the Holocaust this festival was still celebrated and I think it helped people maintain a sense of humanity just to know there would a light at the end of this darkest of eras and I do think it gave some people that bit of hope.

Below are some examples of the Hanukkah celebrations during the Holocaust.

Lodz, Poland, 1941, Nachman Zonabend distributing sweets to children at Hanukkah

bc1a3cafeb674d13a5911383a0ffbf3f

Westerbork, Holland, Lighting the candles on the seventh night of Hanukkah

westerbork

Westerbork, Holland, a Hanukkah party in the camp

4613_346

Lodz, Poland, 1943, a group photograph at a Hanukkah party in the ghetto

37go5_

Shanghai, China, 1939, a Hanukkah party for refugee children in the Twig family’s home

5008_2

Lodz, Poland, 1943, Hanukkah in the ghetto

37go4_

Bucharest, Romania, 1942, lighting of the Hanukkah candelabrum

105co1

Lodz, Poland, Lighting the Hanukkah candles with the Chairman of the Judenrat, Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski.

39eo3_

https://dirkdeklein.net/2016/04/26/chaim-mordechai-rumkowski-lodz-ghetto/

This incredible image depicts Jews, not in hiding, but within an transit camp in Holland lighting a Menorah on Hanukkah. If you look carefully, you can see just how packed this room is.

lesson6_31-570x418

Pictured here is a Hanukkah menorah that was made in a forced labor camp in Gogolin, Upper Silesia in Hanukkah 1941.

23do4s

This photograph from 1940 Berlin is another powerful reminder of spiritual resistance during the Holocaust.

hanukkah-berlin

Donation

I am passionate about my site and I know a you all like reading my blogs. I have been doing this at no cost and will continue to do so. All I ask is for a voluntary donation of $2 ,however if you are not in a position to do so I can fully understand, maybe next time then. Thanks To donate click on the credit/debit card icon of the card you will use. If you want to donate more then $2 just add a higher number in the box left from the paypal link. Many thanks

$2.00