Profiling the Criminal mind of Hitler.

OSS REPORT

How do you profile the mind of one of the most evil men whoever roamed the Earth?

The Office of Strategic Services(now CIA) tasked psychoanalyst Walter C. Langer and psychologist Henry Murray to come up with an extensive analysis of Hitler’s mind in 1943. The reports used many sources to profile Hitler, including a number of informants, including Hitler’s nephew, William Patrick Hitler but also Hitler’s book “Mein Kampf”

Langer’s report was titled ” Adolf Hitler: Psychological Analysis of Hitler’s Life & Legend”  It was published in 1972 as “The Mind of Adolf Hitler: The Secret Wartime Report” by Basic Books. . Murray’s report was titled “Analysis of the Personality of Adolph Hitler”

In order to keep this blog readable I will put the links of both reports at the end of this blog. Rather then putting the whole text in the blog. It would become an article  of close to 300 pages. I will however pick a few interesting points of the reports.

Dr Walter Langer divided his report into six sections.

  • Hitler As He Believes Himself To Be
  • Hitler As the German People Know Him
  • Hitler As His Associates Know Him
  • Hitler As He Knows Himself
  • Psychological Analysis and Reconstruction
  • Hitler’s Probable Behavior in the Future

The report is notable for making several correct predictions about Hitler’s future:

++As the war turns against him, his emotions will intensify and will have outbursts more frequently. His public appearances will become much rarer, because he’s unable to face a critical audience.
++There might be an assassination attempt on him by the German aristocracy, the Wehrmacht officers or Oberkommando der Wehrmacht, because of his superhuman self-confidence in his military judgment.
++There will be no surrender, capitulation, or peace negotiations. The course he will follow will almost certainly be the road to ideological immortality, resulting in the greatest vengeance on a world he despises.
++From what we know of his psychology, the most likely possibility is that he will commit suicide in the event of defeat. It’s probably true he has an inordinate fear of death, but possibly being a psychopath he would undoubtedly weigh his options and perform the deed.

Additionally  to the prediction that Hitler would most likely choose suicide, if Germany was defeated Langer’s report claimed that Hitler was “probably impotent”as far as heterosexual relations were concerned and that there was a possibility that Hitler had participated in a homosexual relationship. The report stated that:

“The belief that Hitler is homosexual has probably developed A. from the fact that he does show so many feminine characteristics, and B.from the fact that there were so many homosexuals in the Party during the early days and many continue to occupy important positions. It is probably true that Hitler calls Foerster “Bubi”, which is a common nickname employed by homosexuals in addressing their partners. This alone, however, is not adequate proof that he has actually indulged in homosexual practices with Foerster, who is known to be a homosexual.”(Albert Maria Forster was a Nazi German politician and war criminal and a close associate to Hitler)

fOERSTER

Henry A. Murray’s report was divided in 4 parts.

  • Part A , Brief Analysis of Hitler’s Personality
  • Part B , Predictions of Hitler’s Behavior
  • Part C , Suggestions for the Treatment of Hitler
  • Part D , Suggestions for the Treatment of the German People

There is some overlap between the two wartime reports.

More recently ,Handwriting analyst Sheila Lowe analysed the handwriting of Adolf Hitler, she concluded.

  • He had a cruel and angry nature.
  • He had the hallmarks of an inharmonious personality with an authoritarian attitude and lack of tolerance.
  • There was a sign of depression and lack of optimism and little or no sense of humor to relieve the irritability .
  • There were indications of shyness and inhibition but by contrast there were also signs of his pride in his achievements.
  • There were also suggestions of an explosive temper.
  • He was also very impulsive and was rigidly confirmed in his personal beliefs and indifferent of differing opinions.

handwritin

All of these findings are quite obvious to us now, but it is interesting to see that especially Dr. Langer had already figured out Hitler in 1943.

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Sources

CIA

Profile of a Criminal Mind

https://archive.org/details/APsychologicalAnalysisofAdolfHitler

https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/CIA-RDP78-02646R000100030002-2.pdf

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The strange case of Douglas Kelley, Nuremberg Trials Psychiatrist

Lt. Colonel Douglas McGlashan Kelley (11 August 1912 – January 1, 1958) was a United States Army Military Intelligence Corps officer who served as chief psychiatrist at Nuremberg Prison during the Nuremberg War Trials. He was charged with ascertaining defendants’ competency evaluations before standing trial.

NUREMBERG TRIAL

Kelley was born in Truckee, California. He graduated from University of California at Berkeley and received his medical degree from the School of Medicine in San Francisco. He continued his studies at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, earning a Doctor of Medical Science in 1941.

In 1942 he was called to duty in the United States Army Medical Corps as chief psychiatrist for the 30th General Hospital in the European Theatre. Along with psychologist Gustave Gilbert he administered the Rorschach inkblot test to the 22 defendants in the Nazi leadership group prior to the first Nuremberg trials.

Kelley authored two books on the subject: Twenty-two Cells in Nuremberg and The Case of Rudolph Hess.

rudolf_hessDouglas Kelley wrote that one of the things that surprised him most about former Deputy Fuhrer Rudolf Hess was his absolute naivete.

By the time the psychiatrist examined him, he had been in custody for about four years following his attempt to get the British to join the Germans in fighting the Soviet Union. He seemed earnestly shocked that he was taken prisoner and revealed that he was absolutely convinced that he was slowly being poisoned. So Hess began saving food, medicine . . . anything that he was offered, wrapping samples in little brown packages, sealing them with wax, and stockpiling them for later analysis.

When first taken captive, he refused all food. After holding out for a whole day, though, he gave in and accepted some milk. Already suspicious, he would only eat with those who were holding him, but when he got a massive headache afterward, he wrote that it was then that he knew he was being poisoned.

He also wrote that his captors were apparently disappointed when he answered their questions, so he started pretending simply not to remember. He did it so much that eventually, he says, the amnesia was real, and most likely helped along by what he called the “brain poison.”

His certainty that he was being poisoned increased as his captivity dragged on. He thought that there were bones and splinters in his food and powders in his laundry to cause rashes. He claimed that the skin on the inside of his mouth was being worn away and claimed that his stomach pains were so bad that he needed to scrape and eat lime from the walls of his cell relieve the pain. Brain poison was destroying his memory more and more, and kept on believing it even though a Swiss messenger tested his food and told him that there was nothing wrong with it.

1389.8 Holocaust H

When Hermann Goering was taken into custody, what he brought with him alone spoke volumes about his self-importance. There were 12 monogrammed suitcases, jewel-studded medals, the equivalent of about $1 million in cash, several cigar cutters, and a stash of watches and cigarette cases. Along with potassium cyanide capsules sewn into his clothes and stashed in a can of coffee, there was also a suitcase filled with enough paracodeine for a small country.

The case was filled with somewhere around 20,000 capsules, and it’s thought that he had gone directly to Germany’s manufacturers for his stash. That wasn’t all of it, either—he admitted that he had already flushed a large amount of pills before his capture, as he’d thought that it would have been unseemly to have been captured with as many pills as he’d had.

Originally, he claimed that they were part of a doctor’s prescription that he was taking for a heart condition, insisting that he was required to take 40 pills a day. Not surprisingly, they didn’t believe him and had the pills tested. The painkiller, related to morphine and opium, was found to work along the same lines as codeine, but with a stronger sedative action.They started weaning him off the pills immediately, dropping his daily dose to first 38 pills, then to 18. At that point, medical staff were advised not to reduce the dose any further, since they weren’t sure what would happen to him if he was taken off the drugs completely. He was still going through withdrawals by the time Kelley took over his treatment.

5-keitel

Part of establishing whether or not the Nazis were capable of standing trial was the administration of an IQ test. The Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Test was adapted from English and given in German, and at the time, it was one of the most widely used IQ tests available. Scores of 65 or less were classified as “defective,” between 80 and 119 as normal, and 128 and above was “very superior.” Only about 2.2 percent of the population scored in that range. Some of the questions were altered to get rid of any kind of cultural bias, and the test measured things like memory, mental calculations, picking out objects or details deleted from a picture, and even hand speed.

The average for the 21 Nazis tested was 128. (Ley was already dead by this time.) The highest score was 143, from Hjalmar Schacht, with Goering, Arthur Seyss-Inquart, Karl Donitz, Franz von Papen, Erich Raeder, Hans Frank, Hans Fritsche, and Baldur von Schirach all testing 130 or above, and with Joachim von Ribbentrop, Wilhelm Keitel, and Albert Speer all also falling into the “very superior” category.

Their reaction to IQ testing was even more fascinating, with many of them actually looking forward to the testing and most being pleased with the results. Even those like Franz von Papen, who were initially irritated with the idea that they needed to subject themselves to a test that was so far beneath them, admitted that it was one of the more enjoyable moments of their captivity.

Perhaps most bizarre was the reaction of Wilhelm Keitel (pictured above) to the test. He was very, very impressed by it, even going as far as to say that it was much better than the “silly nonsense that German psychologists resorted to.” Later, Kelley discovered that Keitel had outlawed all intelligence testing after his son had flunked out during the tests to enter officer training.

kelley1930scropped

But as the title suggest it is a strange case.Upon honorable discharge in 1946, Kelley was appointed Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in North Carolina. In 1949 he was appointed Professor of Criminology at the University of California at Berkeley. He committed suicide in front of his wife and children on New Year’s Day 1958 by ingesting a capsule of potassium cyanide.

cyanide

He killed himself in the same way as Hermann Goering had done.

His suicide was front-page news for two days in The Chronicle. He was just 45 years old. He had attended a New Year’s Eve party the night before. “He was his usual jovial self,” one guest was quoted as saying. He had driven into San Francisco earlier in the day to pick up his father, a dentist, so they could watch the Rose Bowl on the family’s new color television. He left no note.