Health advice you really shouldn’t follow.

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I know the W.H.O keeps changing their minds on what is and isn’t healthy, but throughout the years there have been ad campaigns claiming that things were healthy which we now can safely assume that they weren’t

The above poster an ad for an asbestos pad for the dining table. We know now that asbestos powder can cause cancer when ingested or breathed in.

This is one example that presents terrible advice for modern viewers, but good advice for people at the time. While modern alkaline batteries are toxic and should not be burned, through the late 1950s, most people used zinc batteries that burned harmlessly in a fire.

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A 1930s ad promoting the false idea that bad skin is caused by internal toxins and can only be cured by ingesting yeast.

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An 1800s advertisement for stramonium cigarettes used to treat asthma. We now of course know that inhaling smoke can intensify the symptoms of asthma.

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Coca-Cola ad that tells readers to give their children the drink at a young age.

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Ad for a tonic wine that is claimed to cure depression

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A children’s painting book that encourages the use of lead paint. The ingestion of lead paint b children has been found, in recent decades, to cause many developmental diseases.

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Ad for a milk of magnesia that promotes it as a cure for “feeling like you’re smoking too much.”

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Advertisement portraying vitamin-filled donuts as healthy

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When smoking was still ‘good’ for you.

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Yes this will be a blog, no this will not be one of those preachy ones.

I am not a smoker in fact I never had a cigarette, so I will not tell people what to do. Although It is a well known fact at this stage smoking is bad for you, but so are many other things, however people are responsible for their own lives.

Below are some tobacco advertisements from days of yore .

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Recommended by Doctors

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Medicine for asthma, who would have guessed.

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Scientifically purer then water

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It even helps fight fatigue and irritability.

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Not one single throat irritation

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It even keeps the army fit and strong.

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Dentist even recommend it for throat ease. They would of course, they are dentists.

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WWII Newspaper ads,articles and pictures

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This is just a picture blog of random ads ads and pictures which appeared in newspapers during WWII.

In this image provided by the Army Press Relations, although Colonel Floyd E. Dunn, Sioux City, Iowa knows his jungle warfare, when it comes to the tenor saxophone, he gives in to the expert coaching of band leader Corporal Leon D. Weills of West Sommerville, Massachusetts. It all came about when musical-minded GI’s of the Americal division decided to entertain men on the fighting outposts in the South Pacific with probing jive on Oct. 14, 1944. With instruments provided by the Special Service Office, the combat soldiers journeyed through 5000 yards of jungle to put on the show. From left to right the men are: Front row – Pvt. Robert A. Silverdrist, Chicago, Ill.; Cpl. Leon D. Wells, West Sommerville, Mass.; Col. Floyd E. Dunn, Sioux City, Iowa; Pvt. Erric V. Carlson, Tanana, Alaska; Pfc. Harold D. Fisher, Youngstown, Ohio; Pvt. George Zito, Los Angeles, Calif.; Pvt. Perry T. Austin, Kenniwick, Wash.; row two – Pfc. Ben A. Cuatto, Salt Lake City, Utah; Pvt. Ralph C. Kagle, Fornfelt, Mo.; Pfc. Jack A. Davis, Lampeer, Mich.; William D. Holland, South Buro, Mass.; Cpl. Arthur J. Rauhala, Painsville, Ohio; and Pvt. William D. Cribley, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Drummer – Pvt. James E. Pabilla, Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Army Press Relations)

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Seen here is an army troop at Camp Douglas near Salt Lake City in December 1942. (AP Photo)

Military Recreation

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British Royal Navy Recruiting Poster Print 1940

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Imagined German Intelligence Officer thanks British Forces for giving away details of operations.

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The Crossfield family during WWII

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The Gloucester Citizen announces the start of WW2

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WWII Coke Ad illustration Soldier

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The Pilot (Southern Pines, N.C.), October 27, 1944

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WWII Advertisements

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Just because there was a war going on didn’t mean that companies abolished their marketing needs. The advertising trade was still booming. Nothing beats and old fashioned dose of patriotism to get your products sold(or sometimes not sold).Lets face it advertising is really a commercial form of propaganda.

Below are some examples of advertisements from the WWII era.

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According to this May 1944 National Geographic advertisement, “some things”—presumably love and superior tire quality—”never change.” Nevertheless, this General Tire advertisement encourages readers not to buy the company’s tires during wartime for the sake of rationing rubber.

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In this September 1944 National Geographic advertisement, Minneapolis Honeywell Temperature Controls promises homeowners that in the postwar future, they’ll be able to purchase heating and cooling systems that seem straight out of science fiction

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Nestle 1943

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Phillips Bicycles

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Kolynos Toothpaste

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Have a coke and a smile

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Nestle’s, Propaganda Chocolate Sweets WWII Chocolate Is a Fighting Food, USA

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Can’t go without a smoke

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Thanksgiving 1942

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